The installation “M.G.’s Life That She Has Forgotten” is formed of photographs most of which have handwritten sentences or comments on their backs, framed almost like self-sent postcards in an attempt to remember and- if possible- prevent one’s life to fall apart. Rebuilding M.G's living room with sixty of her real life photos, selected among hundreds, is an attempt to recall her past and memories.  The photographs being all framed with their backs- full of handwritten notes to the dear ones and personal remarks- facing the audience, intend to make a quite invitation to interact with the work, by turning the frames back and forth to discover the hidden past of a dramatic persona. The armchair, curtain by the window, reading lamp, water glass and a diary note of her care-taker when M.G.’s memory and consciousness have totally left her, are pieced together to enhance the sense of her living atmosphere towards the end of her life.   So the installation as a whole is an invitation for the viewers towards a journey through the stages of a woman, by giving clues about life styles, psychology and social relations in the twentieth century urban Turkey.
       
     
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 The installation “M.G.’s Life That She Has Forgotten” is formed of photographs most of which have handwritten sentences or comments on their backs, framed almost like self-sent postcards in an attempt to remember and- if possible- prevent one’s life to fall apart. Rebuilding M.G's living room with sixty of her real life photos, selected among hundreds, is an attempt to recall her past and memories.  The photographs being all framed with their backs- full of handwritten notes to the dear ones and personal remarks- facing the audience, intend to make a quite invitation to interact with the work, by turning the frames back and forth to discover the hidden past of a dramatic persona. The armchair, curtain by the window, reading lamp, water glass and a diary note of her care-taker when M.G.’s memory and consciousness have totally left her, are pieced together to enhance the sense of her living atmosphere towards the end of her life.   So the installation as a whole is an invitation for the viewers towards a journey through the stages of a woman, by giving clues about life styles, psychology and social relations in the twentieth century urban Turkey.
       
     

The installation “M.G.’s Life That She Has Forgotten” is formed of photographs most of which have handwritten sentences or comments on their backs, framed almost like self-sent postcards in an attempt to remember and- if possible- prevent one’s life to fall apart. Rebuilding M.G's living room with sixty of her real life photos, selected among hundreds, is an attempt to recall her past and memories.

The photographs being all framed with their backs- full of handwritten notes to the dear ones and personal remarks- facing the audience, intend to make a quite invitation to interact with the work, by turning the frames back and forth to discover the hidden past of a dramatic persona. The armchair, curtain by the window, reading lamp, water glass and a diary note of her care-taker when M.G.’s memory and consciousness have totally left her, are pieced together to enhance the sense of her living atmosphere towards the end of her life. 

So the installation as a whole is an invitation for the viewers towards a journey through the stages of a woman, by giving clues about life styles, psychology and social relations in the twentieth century urban Turkey.

_DSC0473.JPG
       
     
_DSC0458k.jpg
       
     
_DSC0465k.jpg
       
     
_DSC0461.JPG
       
     
_DSC0463k.jpg
       
     
_DSC0462.JPG
       
     
_DSC0477k.jpg
       
     
_DSC0484k.jpg
       
     
_DSC0482k.jpg
       
     
_DSC0488k.jpg
       
     
IMG_5163.jpg